Athlete Support - Best of Greens - Daily Nutrition - Fitness - Greens

4 Easy Vegan Sources of Protein

vegan protein

Going plant-based is exciting, but it can also be a little confusing. Certain questions start to come up when you first start your journey:

  • Does fake-cheese taste as good as real cheese? 
  • Is barbecue chick’n as good as barbecue chicken? 
  • Is being vegan going to be this hard forever? 

All jokes aside, most of us depend on animal products for a chunk of our nutrition. So switching over to just plants (or mostly plants) can throw us for a loop. Most vegan babies (new vegans, not actual babies that happen to be vegan) stumble at first, but find their way.

A frequently asked question by new vegans is: what can I eat to ensure I’m getting my protein?

Today, we’re answering that question.And don’t worry–if you think you need to get creative, think again! It’s super easy to work in some protein.

Here are four easy vegan choices.

Pure Planet spirulina toast

Photo cred: @biohackingjen (Instagram)

Sea Greens – Spirulina

Spiru-what? If you’re not well-versed in the green veggie world, you may not have any idea what the heck we’re talking about here. Spirulina is one of our most favorite greens because of its nutritional content.

Here’s a little run-down about this sea plant:

  • Nutrient-dense, packed with minerals that help support your body
  • Filled with antioxidants that support oxidation (basically, it helps your body fight free radicals and also works as a post-workout pick-me-up)
  • May help balance healthy cholesterol levels

What’s more, this blue-green ocean flora can also supply protein. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), spirulina contains about 4 grams of per tablespoon.

According to Harvard Health, our recommended protein allowance per day amounts to about 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight. So, adding spirulina to one your meals or snacks could help you reach your daily protein goals.

For fun ways to incorporate this sea green into your diet, check out some of these spirulina recipes.

chickpea, legumes, vegan protein

Legumes

What are some other plants that can help you get your daily protein? Consume some legumes!

In case you did not know, legumes are the fruits and seeds of a plant. Some of our favorites include:

  • chickpeas
  • lentils
  • peas
  • kidney beans

In particular, we love peas! Peas can supply 8.2 grams of protein and 8.8 grams of fiber. Because of this, nutritionists and nutrition-based companies create protein shakes using these little bulbs of awesomeness.

We do not have a protein shake made with peas at Pure Planet, but we do have something equally as cool! Meet Master Amino Acid Pattern!

Our Master Amino Acid Pattern is predigested, 100% vegetarian protein support, made from legumes! Because these legumes are pre-digested in a patented process, they may help aid protein synthesis. Basically, they can be used to help your body create protein by supporting amino acid production.*

Because of this, these legumes may also help fuel workouts, whether you are running a marathon on the treadmill or pumping iron by the weight racks.

chia seeds, vegan protein

Chia Seeds & Hemp Seeds

From one type of seed, we move on to other cool choices: chia and hemp seeds!

Chia seeds can help provide 4 grams of protein and a whopping 11 grams of fiber in one serving size. What’s more, these seeds pack amino acids like peas. This means that are quality protein source.

Hemp seeds work in the same way. The USDA reports that hemp seeds contain about 9.46 grams of seeds in about 3 tablespoons. What’s more, hemp seeds contain essential fatty acids, which help promote brain health and more.

Both chia and hemp seeds are easy to incorporate into your diet. You can buy a big bag and sprinkle them in literally everything you consume: from water to salads to workout smoothies!

green veggies, vegan protein

Leafy, Green Veggies

And last but not least, leafy, green veggies can help provide protein for plant-based eaters. So, if you were trying to avoid eating your veggies, sorry!

While every vegetable contains essential minerals and antioxidants, not all contain equal amounts of protein. Courtesy of Medical News Today, here are the protein-packed veggies you should be gorging on:

  • watercress
  • alfalfa sprouts
  • bok choy
  • asparagus
  • broccoli

Getting your greens in could be a bit hard, and that is why we created our Best of Greens mix, containing cereal grasses (like barley grass), cruciferous veggies (like broccoli and kale), algae and sea veggies (like spirulina and kelp).

For fun ways to work greens into your day, check out our mini-guide.

 

Pure + True Since ’92

At Pure Planet, we like to give you the goods, without the nasties. Our products do not contain fillers, artificial flavors or GMOs. Check out our selection of superfoods.

Pure Planet Superfoods

*These statements and products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Apple Cider Vinegar - Recipes

Pure Planet Apple Cider Vinegar Cookies

Pure Planet Apple Cider Vinegar Cookies
Sweater season is nearly upon us and pumpkin spice isn’t the only thing in the air. What’s that crisp, sweet smell, you ask? Apples, of course!
While we’re not going to say that 1 apple a day will keep all the illnesses at bay, we do know that apples, fresh and fermented, are one of the planet’s most nutritiously-dense fruits.
As the market stands are loaded with organic, freshly-picked apples, it’s high time for some recipe inspo that blends seasonal raw foods with our Apple Cider Vinegar drinks so you can enjoy the best of each world this harvest season.
Here are two yummy ACV cookie recipes!
Apple Cider Vinegar Lemon Cookie

Lemon, Ginger Cookies

If you’re looking for a snack with a a little twang, these babies will hit the spot. The moment we saw this Loving it Vegan recipe, we just knew we had to put our own spin on it.

Just feast your eyes (and your mouth) on this recipe. Who can say that your cookie has digestive-boosting ingredients, like ginger and apple cider vinegar? You can after you give this a try!

What You’ll Need:

  • 1-2 teaspoons or 1 scoop of Pure Planet Apple Cider Vinegar – Probiotic*
  • 1/2 cup of vegan butter
  • 3/4 cup of coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest for more lemon taste
  • 2 tbsp almond milk (more if needed for consistency if needed)

* You may want an additional 1-2 teaspoons or 1 scoop for a stronger, bolder taste. 

Directions 

Add the ingredients together.

  1. Mix the vegan butter and coconut sugar together until it is creamy. This may be easier if you use a mixer of some sort, but your hand and spoon work too!
  2. Mix in 1-2 teaspoons of Pure Planet ACV.
  3. Add baking soda and extra lemon or ACV if desired. Mix.
  4. Mix in almond milk.
  5. Separate your dough into small ball-sized pieces and flatten for thinner cookies.
  6. Put in the oven at 350°F for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  7. Enjoy!

Apple Cider Vinegar Alkalizer Cookie

Chocolate, Cherry Cookies

This sweet treat is sure to please if you love cherry and chocolate. Plus, you get the added bonus of enjoying something delicious and nutritious! We adapted a recipe from Detoxinista to include one of our favorite alkalizing blends, which includes cherry, beets and ACV!

What You’ll Need: 

*You may want an additional 1-2 teaspoons or 1 scoop for a stronger, bolder taste. 

Directions 

  1. Mix the almond flour and coconut oil together in a bowl.
  2. Add in Pure Planet ACV, maple syrup and baking soda. Mix well.
  3. Fold in chocolate chips (basically, just make sure you mix the chocolate chips in gently, but firmly with your hands or a spoon-they might melt if you’re not careful)
  4. Heat in the oven at 250ºF for 20 to 30 minutes or 15 minutes at 350ºF.
  5. Enjoy after cooling.

Show and Tell

Did you try our recipe? Do you have an apple cider vinegar recipe of your own? Let us know in the comments or on our Instagram!

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Daily Nutrition

Apple Cider Benefits – Weight Loss And More

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) may taste bitter, but the benefits of drinking this elixir are pretty sweet! From digestive support with probiotics to alkalizing acetic acid, nutritionists LOVE this natural remedy’s ability to promote health.

But did you know this tonic can help you shed some pounds while encouraging your heart health too? Here are some more benefits of this beloved superfood drink.

Apples from apple cider vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits

Weight Loss Support

Keeping You Full

Looking to lose weight? Sipping on some cider could help you reach your goal. Unfortunately, taking a swig does not magically shrink your waist, but adding it to your routine can boost your results.

Here’s the gist: the acid in apple cider vinegar may help you feel full for longer, thus making you less likely to overeat. And that’s not just based on anecdotal experience, it’s backed by science!

Researchers at Swedish college Lund University studied how acetic acid could help affect the glycemic index of bread, paying special attention to insulin levels and fullness. (1) Published in The European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the investigative study focused on 12 healthy volunteers.

What were the results?

Volunteers felt fuller when they consumed the vinegar before eating their carb-packed meal. Plus, the acid helped balance blood glucose and insulin levels. But we’ll get to that benefit a little later.

Researchers at the Arizona State University took their own exploration on satiety a bit further–they quantified just how many calories you may be able to save by ingesting apple cider vinegar before you eat. (2)

So, what they find?

With increased fullness, participants ended up saving 200-275 calories when eating a carb-loaded meal. It may not sound like a lot, but if you add these numbers up daily, they could lead to an easy way to shed some lbs.

But ACV does more than just help you feel full–it may also help you reduce body fat too.

Fat-loss Support

We just have to get this out the way: YAAAS! Okay, cool, let’s talk. Losing stubborn body fat is a a true plight of mankind, so we LOVE hearing that this sour liquid can help.

One study published in Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry found that the acetic acid present in vinegar may help keep body fat accumulation down. (3)

Japanese researchers focused on obese individuals, supplementing them with daily ACV for 12 weeks. This placebo-controlled, double-blind study found that participants who drank the vinegar enjoyed “significantly” lower body weight and visceral fat when compared to those who did ingest the tart drink.

That’s good news! Along with greens, like spirulina, this vinegar is a must-have in your weight loss regimen

But there’s even more that is great about this tart tonic. Apple cider vinegar can help promote health by also encouraging a healthy heart.

Here’s how.

apple cider juice

Heart Health Support

Blood Glucose, Insulin and Triglycerides

This tart superfood drink is so great for the heart that many institutions have studied it as a means of supporting individuals with diabetes. Remember when we mentioned balanced glucose and insulin levels earlier? Now let’s talk about that!

One literature analysis published in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice reviewed the purported benefits of acetic acid in vinegar. Overall, those benefits were supported by well-researched analysis. (4)

Here’s how it works. The acid can help lower triglyceride levels, which are little molecules that make up fats and oils. If you have a high level of these, you’re more likely to suffer from a stroke, according to the University of Michigan. 

Because this vinegar can help balance triglycerides, it may be able to lower cholesterol as well.

What’s more, researchers have found that ACV helps balance glucose concentrations and insulin. One study found that nightly ingestion helped individuals with Type 2 Diabetes enjoy reduced levels the next morning. (5).

Blood Pressure

Because of its ability to help blood glucose, insulin-levels and other diabetes-related conditions, researchers have also focused on this vinegar’s effect on blood pressure.

So, how does it fare? While human research is sparing, it is positive! One Harvard study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consumption helped decrease the risk in of heart disease in a group of women. (6)

Overall, like beets, apple cider vinegar can be a perfect superfood to integrate into your heart health regimen.

Apple Cider Vinegar Alkalizer and Probiotic

Pure Planet Knows ACV

You may know that apple cider vinegar is good for your health, yet the bitter taste might leave you gagging. No worries! We blend our apple cider vinegar powders with whole foods to help boost flavor and benefit.

So, what will it be? The cherry-punch Alkaline blend or our lemon, gingerade Probiotic blend?

Looking for more reviews of hyped products? Check out what we think of aloe vera.

Links

  1. Östman, E., Granfeldt, Y., Persson, L., & Björck, I. (2005). Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects. European journal of clinical nutrition59(9), 983.
  2. Johnston, C. S., & Buller, A. J. (2005). Vinegar and peanut products as complementary foods to reduce postprandial glycemia. Journal of the American Dietetic Association105(12), 1939-1942.
  3. Kondo, T., Kishi, M., Fushimi, T., Ugajin, S., & Kaga, T. (2009). Vinegar intake reduces body weight, body fat mass, and serum triglyceride levels in obese Japanese subjects. Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry73(8), 1837-1843.
  4. Shishehbor, F., Mansoori, A., & Shirani, F. (2017). Vinegar consumption can attenuate postprandial glucose and insulin responses; a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. diabetes research and clinical practice127, 1-9.
  5. White, A. M., & Johnston, C. S. (2007). Vinegar ingestion at bedtime moderates waking glucose concentrations in adults with well-controlled type 2 diabetes. Diabetes care30(11), 2814-2815.
  6. Hu, F. B., Stampfer, M. J., Manson, J. E., Rimm, E. B., Wolk, A., Colditz, G. A., … & Willett, W. C. (1999). Dietary intake of α-linolenic acid and risk of fatal ischemic heart disease among women. The American journal of clinical nutrition69(5), 890-897.
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Daily Nutrition - Energy Support - Fitness - Gut Health - Immune Support - Weight Loss

Should You Ditch Sports Drinks for Coconut Water or Vitamin Water? Here’s the Science-Backed Answer

Whether you’re going hard on the treadmill, waking up with a mind-numbing hangover or just quenching thirst on a hot day, sports drinks have become an American staple. Children even pack them in their school lunches. But should we be downing this drink as often as we do?

The market has expanded since the inception of these beverages in the ’90’s. Other energy-boosting alternatives (like beet juice and blends) take up just as much space in the market aisles. But today, we’re comparing three options. Between sports drinks, vitamin water and coconut water, which is the better choice?

The answer? Well, it’s important to focus on how you’re going to use them and just what ingredients go into your specific drink of choice. Let’s dive in a little deeper with a comparison.

How Do Sports Drinks Fare?

Exercise and Performance 

Sports drinks weren’t always multi-purpose. They were first created in response to fatigued football players on the field. Does its purpose keep up decades later? A University of California, Berkeley report suggests that the beverage might actually be beneficial for hydration and endurance.  But…there’s a catch.

The study merely suggests that they could be beneficial…if someone is working out vigorously in a session for 90 minutes or more; however, those results can’t be extended any farther than that. And it does not take into account how daily consumption would contribute to overall health.

What does this mean? Well, for the average person putting in say, 30 to 60 minutes a day, these drinks wouldn’t be doing the job. And even then, the harmful extras could do more harm than good in the long run.

So, what danger lurks in these drinks?

Drawbacks 

Most sport drinks contain a bunch of additives, which makes adding these as your daily go-to’s a definite no-no. Some of these drinks may include:

  • high fructose corn syrup (glucose-fructose syrup)
  • sucrose syrup
  • sodium citrate
  • monopotassium phosphate
  • food starch
  • color additives (such as red 40)

Does anything already stick out to you? You might have already found at least two things you are shaking your head at. There are no super nutrients, just super dud ingredients.

First, let’s tackle the syrups. High fructose corn syrup helps sweeten and lengthen the shelf life of food and drinks. However, the syrup is associated with consequences. For example, the American Society of Nephrology suggests the syrup can contribute to higher blood pressure levels in adults, even with no history of hypertension.

And sucrose syrup? This sweetener has been tied to the promotion of obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and artery disease. (1)

But, do the added chemicals do any benefit? Short answer, not really. In theory, adding potassium and sodium may sound like a good idea, but they don’t really add anything when drinking from sports drinks. You’re much better off just getting this from trace minerals from fruits, veggies and whole foods. (If you need help working greens, try our 4 easy steps to start eating more veggies).

Let’s not forget bout the color additives. You should stay away from those. Their sole existence is to make the drinks look more marketable, but studies have linked them to higher risks of hyperactivity in children and risk of other diseases.(2)

What About Vitamin Water?

Okay, so maybe sipping on a sports drink isn’t the best idea. Is vitamin water any better than sports drinks?

Like sports drinks, this concoction was created when plain water just didn’t do the trick. Some people thought, “what if we could add minerals and vitamins to boost rehydration?” Flash forward to now, where vitamin waters are plentiful, with diet and zero-calorie options to match.

But are they any different than sports drinks? Not really.

Exercise and Endurance

Again, adding minerals and vitamins to your drink sounds appealing. For people who avoid swallowing vitamin capsules (it can be difficult, we get it), seeking out vitamins through this route seems ideal.

With added electrolytes, certain vitamin water choices might come in handy, but only during hard, intense workouts here and there.

But what about an average user? The additives may set the drink back.

Drawbacks

In theory, vitamin waters are great: just replenish what you’re losing. Perfect, except that’s not exactly how that works.

Some of these beverages can contain excess amounts of vitamins, way more than one person would need in a day. And unless you were really pumping iron, like every second of a long workout, there is no way you would lose enough electrolytes or vitamins to even warrant the excess in each bottle.

But that’s fine, right? The more, the merrier? Actually, no. As with lots of things in life, too much of anything can be detrimental.

Plus, these drinks often fall prey to the same ingredient listings as sports drinks, including harmful syrups and sugars, and their potential damage. (3) It’s best to opt out of this choice.

So, how does coconut water compare?

Is Coconut Water Any Better Than Sports Drinks?

Is coconut water just another online health fad or does it actually have value? Until recently, coconut water was only seen as a healthy, hydration choice, especially for those that wanted a little different taste from plan water. But nowadays, it’s multi-purposeful.

So, what does coconut water have going for it?

Naturally, coconut water contains several plant nutrients:

  • antioxidant properties (like those of  tart cherry)
  • fiber
  • vitamin C (like the amla berry)
  • important minerals, like electrolytes, magnesium, calcium and potassium

But can coconut water be beneficial for working out?

Coconut Water & Working Out 

Part of the water’s antioxidant properties can help fight free radicals, which can be triggered during stress or injury. This can affect blood pressure, which may indirectly affect your workout. (4)

As for actual workout benefits? The research is sparse, but it’s still looking good. Because this water contains electrolytes, it can be a good source of replenishment after a good round of exercising.

One study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sport Nutrition suggests there this hydrating drink can stand up to high-electrolyte drinks in the replenishing category, with less calories and more natural nutrients. (5) Another study published in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology and Applied Human Science suggests sodium-infused coconut water and regular sport’s drinks perform on par as well. (6)

Of course, plain water can fuel average workouts too, but when it comes to intense workouts, you can opt for coconut water instead of high calories and fructose-filled options. Just be sure your coconut water uses pure and true ingredients and is free of added sugars.

Pure Planet Coconut Water 

Coconut water is already great, so some superfood-help can only make it more awesome! That’s why we carefully crafted our premium coconut water blends.

  • Joint Rescue: Optimized with tumeric and black pepper, this blend promotes healthy joints–for athletes and non-athlete’s alike!
  • Rehydrate: Mixed with ginger, mineral salts and rooibos, this blend provides boosted hydration support, supporting electrolyte balance.
  • Energy: Specially-designed with yerbe mate and rhodiola root, this blend promotes stable energy.

Stay hydrated, friends!

Cited Studies:

  1. Shapiro, A., Tümer, N., Gao, Y., Cheng, K. Y., & Scarpace, P. J. (2011). Prevention and reversal of diet-induced leptin resistance with a sugar-free diet despite high fat content. British Journal of Nutrition106(3), 390-397.
  2. Arnold, L. E., Lofthouse, N., & Hurt, E. (2012). Artificial food colors and attention-deficit/hyperactivity symptoms: conclusions to dye for. Neurotherapeutics9(3), 599-609.
  3. Malik, V. S., Schulze, M. B., & Hu, F. B. (2006). Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review–. The American journal of clinical nutrition84(2), 274-288.
  4. Santos, J. L., Bispo, V. S., BC FILHO, A. D. R. I. A. N. O., Pinto, I. F., Dantas, L. S., Vasconcelos, D. F., … & Gomes, O. F. (2013). Evaluation of chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of coconut water (Cocus nucifera L.) and caffeic acid in cell culture. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências85(4), 1235-1247.
  5. Kalman, D. S., Feldman, S., Krieger, D. R., & Bloomer, R. J. (2012). Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition9(1), 1.
  6. Saat, M., Singh, R., Sirisinghe, R. G., & Nawawi, M. (2002). Rehydration after exercise with fresh young coconut water, carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage and plain water. Journal of physiological anthropology and applied human science21(2), 93-104.
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Athlete Support - Energy Support - Fitness - Fulvic Zeolite - Gut Health - Lifestyle Tips - Senior Health - Weight Loss

What is Fulvic Acid + Why Should You Use It?

If you’re looking for a natural substance that can not only help boost your health on the inside while encouraging clear, fresh skin on the outside, then you’ve stumbled to the right place. Today, we’re talking about fulvic acid and its benefits.

We know what you’re thinking: what the heck is fulvic acid? To be honest, it doesn’t really sound all that appealing. It kind of sounds like it comes straight out of a nuclear power plant or superhero movie. Luckily, it will not give you radioactive super powers, but it can give your body some natural super powers. We’ve been pure and true since 1992, so no chemically-altered ingredients here, just pure superfoods.

Interestingly enough, these organic compounds come straight from the earth (literally!). Even though it is widely available, it can be a little hard to find in stores. You’ll have to look into specialty health places to get your hands on some (or you can visit pureplanet.com, of course).

Allow us to shed some light on why we love this natural acid and why we think you’ll love it too.

What is Fulvic Acid?

Fulvic acid is a humic substance, meaning it is organically found in soil, bodies of water, and particular foods. Some believe this acid helps give greens and fruits some of their minerals when they are grown in rich soil.

As a supplement, you’ll likely see it as a yellow powder or in liquid form.

What Does It Do?

Acting as an electrolyte and mineral, this acid helps the body cleanse toxins and boost nutrient absorption (1). In more scientific terms, the acid helps convert inorganic substances to organic substances that our bodies can easily use. What’s more, fulvic acid helps the body at the cellular level (2). It helps cells become more permeable, so that they may absorb more water, but release toxins and metals in a chelation process (3). Like chlorella, this is a must-have in any detox regimen.

Here’s how the unique properties affect major body functions.

It encourages metabolism and digestion

Because of its cleansing benefits, fulvic acid can help rid the gut of “bad bacteria.” What’s more, the acid works like a prebiotic to create a safe space for the “good” bacteria to live in the stomach. In essence, you just found your probiotic’s best friend!  Reminder: Probiotics are great for nurturing your gut’s bacterial flora and can be found naturally in foods or drinks, like apple cider vinegar.  

Plus, some studies suggest that trace minerals found in the acid boosts metabolism by helping to digest protein and carbs quicker. It’s a digestive powerhouse, which is why we like to use it every day.

And guess what? This process can help your skin too!

Fulvic acid may help the body respond to inflammation & improve healthy appearance of the skin 

Through detox, fulvic acid promotes healthy elimination of chemicals that contribute to free radical production. Free radicals help the body in some ways, but too many can lead to inflammation, wrinkles and skin damage. These chemicals are in highly processed foods and even polluted air.

What’s more, this natural acid boasts antioxidants that naturally fight free radicals. Anecdotal evidence suggests skin appears more tightened and tone after use; however, more research is needed to confirm this.

Either way, fulvic acid is definitely one of the easier beauty tools to use that won’t require you to watch a 20-minute make-up tutorial and fail miserably (come on Kylie Jenner, it looked so much easier when you did it!) It’s really awesome when superfoods, like rice bran solubles, are able to help us feel beautiful on the inside and out.

It may help boost your workouts and encourage recovery

As a natural way to fight free radicals and prevent inflammation, this compound makes for a great workout recovery supplement. Your muscles will thank you! Because the acid contains electrolytes, it can also help replenish those lost while you were sweating up a storm. In other words, it helps your stay hydrated.

Plus, mixing fulvic acid with your plain water is much more beneficial to your than chugging a sports drink, full of sugar. We recommend mixing it with some beet juice to keep you energized. Or at the end the night with a little tart cherry to lighten the day’s load on your muscles and inspire some deep sleep.

Looking for a Natural Source?

For any supplement, it is important to choose products that are made naturally and do not contain any fillers. We offer two super potent fulvic acid blends: Ionic Elements (mixed with trace minerals) and Fulvic Zeolite (mixed with zeolite).

Cited Studies:

  1. Carrasco-Gallardo, C., Guzmán, L., & Maccioni, R. B. (2012). Shilajit: a natural phytocomplex with potential procognitive activity. International Journal of Alzheimer’s disease2012.
  2. Man, D., Pisarek, I., Braczkowski, M., Pytel, B., & Olchawa, R. (2014). The impact of humic and fulvic acids on the dynamic properties of liposome membranes: the ESR method. Journal of liposome research24(2), 106-112.
  3. Christl, I., Metzger, A., Heidmann, I., & Kretzschmar, R. (2005). Effect of humic and fulvic acid concentrations and ionic strength on copper and lead binding. Environmental science & technology39(14), 5319-5326.

More Sources:

Wellness Mama’s Fulvic Acid Review 

Dr. Axe Informational Guide to Fulvic Acid

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